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Plant Care Guide

A beautiful landscape requires a considerable amount of care. This maintenance guide will give you necessary instruction on proper maintenance of your new landscape.

We service the Greater St. Louis area including: St Louis, Frontenac, Chesterfield & Brentwood in Missouri; Edwardsville, Belleville, O'Fallon, Swansea & Alton in Illinois and surrounding communities.


SOD

Watering:
Sod must be watered evenly and thoroughly daily during daylight hours for the first ten days. Move sprinklers approximately every hour, over-lapping areas already watered to insure complete coverage. Watch for graying, browning and shrinking sod. These signs indicate a lack of water, and if they should occur, increase the amount of water. If daylight watering is not sufficient, night watering may be necessary as a supplement. After the first ten days, water 2 or 3 times a week (day or night) for the next 30 days. Take special care to water steep slopes; watering more often for shorter periods of time to reduce the chance of sod slippage.

Fertilizing:
Fertilize two or three times per year with a standard agricultural fertilizer. Use 16-8-8 in the early spring at the rate listed the bag for new sod. Use 10-10-10 in the summer and fall. When fertilizing in mid-summer, additional watering may be required to prevent burning.

Mowing:
Mow the lawn to 3.5" as soon as the grass reaches seed". The lawn should not be cut under 3" the first year. A grass catcher or other removal of clippings is recommended.

Weeds:
Weeds may often become a problem two or three weeks after the sod has been laid. Weed seeds cannot be avoided. They are carried by the wind and in the topsoil. Most of the weeks are annuals and will die out after the first winter provided a healthy lawn is properly maintained. If weeds persist, call Envisioning Green to schedule a weed control treatment. If weed killers are desired the first year, they can not be used before the third mowing.

SEED

Mulch:
The straw mulch covering your newly seeded lawn has the purpose of holding moisture and preventing erosion. If bunching should occur, re-spread, but do not remove. It will decompose and add humus to the soil

Watering:
To have a healthy stand of grass, watering is essential. Once the seed has germinated, keep the soil most until the grass attains 3 inches in height, being careful not to create run-off. If the young seedlings are allowed to die from lack of water, additional seed will have to be spread. Keep the soil most by watering 2 or 3 times a week until seed is established. Established seed should be watered once a week with the equivalent of 1" of rain.

Fertilizing:
Fertilize 2 or 3 times per year with a standard agricultural fertilizer. Use 16-8-8 in the early spring, and use 10-10-10 in the fall. When fertilizing in mid-summer, additional watering may be required to prevent burning.

Mowing:
Mow the lawn to 3" as soon as the grass reaches seed". The lawn should not be cut under 3" the first year. A grass catcher or other removal of clippings is recommended.

Weeds:
Weed seeds cannot be avoided. They are carried by the wind and in the topsoil. Most of the weeks are annuals and will die out after the first winter. Do not use weed killer the first year. If you wish, call Envisioning Green to schedule a weed control treatment.

RETAINING WALLS

Boulder Walls:
Weeding is necessary to maintain an attractive boulder wall. However, it can be kept to a minimum by planting the voids or spaces. Sedum, ground junipers, perennials and sumac may be planted in these voids depending on the effect desired. The plants will also help prevent erosion. If erosion does occur between the boulders, bill the spaces with topsoil.

MULCH BEDS

Shredded Bark:
Shredded bark is the best mulch to use for your plants. Bark insulates the roots in summer and winter; it helps hold moisture in the soil; it decomposes, adding nutrients to the soil; and it helps hold down weeds. Some hand weeding is still necessary. This should be completed regularly in Spring.
Stone Mulch:
Hand weeding is necessary to keep mulch beds attractive. Even if rock is placed over plastic, weeds will come up through holes that have been made to allow water to penetrate down to plant roots. Keep stones picked out of lawn. They can become dangerous projectiles when hit by a lawn mower.

PLANTINGS

Watering:
Newly planted nursery stock has a reduced root system. To compensate for the loss of roots, additional watering is essential. Water everyday the week that the planting took place. Water two to three times a week with for the first three weeks, then once a week until the ground freezes. In sandy soils and during droughts, additional watering may be necessary.
Caution: overwatering can be harmful.

Fertilizing:
Fertilizing is generally very beneficial to plants, especially at the time of installation. If Envisioning Green has installed your plants, no further fertilizing will be necessary the first year. For established plants, the best times to fertilize are in early spring before the buds elongate, or in the late fall after the leaves have fallen. It is best not to fertilize in summer or early fall because it forces new growth which will not properly harden off before killing frosts.

Shrub Pruning:
New shrubs should be pruned at time of planting to compensate for loss of roots. If Envisioning Green installed the plants, this has already been done. For established plants that bloom in early spring, it is best to prune after they flower. Summer flowering plants should be pruned in early spring before growth starts.

Tree Pruning:
Trees should be pruned at the time of planting to compensate for loss of roots. You can prune most trees at any time of year. Some trees, like Maples, Walnut and Birch, should be pruned in late spring or early summer to prevent loss of sap. Oaks should be pruned only in dormant season, and only if absolutely necessary. Always prune back to main branch. Do not leave a stub.

Evergreen Pruning:
Evergreens (except Pines) should be pruned in early spring before new growth starts. Look for winter buds and be careful not to prune too much. If you remove all the winter buds from a branch, no new growth will come from that branch. Japanese Yews put on two flushes of growth a year, so they require a second pruning in mid-summer. Pines should be pruned in late spring after new growth has elongated but before needles are fully expanded. Cut back no more than two-thirds of the Pines' new growth.


 

 

Testimonials

We now have our backyard oasis!!! Absolutely love how everything turned out. Brian and his crew were wonderful and paid very close attention to detail!! Any unexpected issues that came up, they were able to quickly fix and when we wanted to add on to the project we were able to get the supplies needed quickly. Overall job well done and can’t wait for future projects with Envisioning Green!! :) big thanks to Charles for the vision, Justin and Steven for keeping it all together and Brian and his crew for making it happen! Time to enjoy some backyard parties!
Mary Beth – Maryville, IL

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We appreciate all the ideas, energy and work you put into our project. From design through construction you were very professional, easy to work with, and committed to giving us what we wanted. We are very pleased with the result and in knowing we chose the right company to create our backyard experience.
– Rick & Brandi – Edwardsville, IL

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We purchased or new Ranch style home nearly four years ago after living in a two-story for 20 plus years. This was the type of home and style of home my wife and I were searching for once we decided to move. We found our dream home sitting on 2 difficult acres. Once in the backyard, it sloped heavily down to a 1 Acre retention pond that was really in awful condition. We did see potential for something very special if we could find the right company to partner with. We met the entire staff at Envisioning green through an invitation to one of their Wine Open Houses. While there, we were able to see their many outdoor exhibits and view their picture portfolios and well as speak with some of their current and past customers.

Late last summer and we had their owner and designer over to discuss the entire project; both pond remediation and backyard creation. We wanted a pool, gas fire pit and an outdoor bar and as usually happens....once we got going, we added a little more!

The process was quite impressive as we gave them a list of must haves and a budget for the project. We did have change orders for things we elected to add but once we signed, it couldn't have gone smoother. The project turned out amazingly like the electronic design plan they initially presented us with no unwanted surprises. They worked through the winter, around the early spring rains and we are now enjoying our backyard immensely.

With our property, there was so much more complexity than what I'm able to describe here and we knew we couldn't turn this over to just any company based solely on price or promise. For the reasonable budget we gave them we received an "HGTV"" backyard in return. Great job Envisioning Green!
Larry & Kris – Maryville, IL

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Don’t Want To Write This Review … Seriously

Having read the title, it would be understandable if your mind jumped to the assumption that I am preparing to present a plethora of faults with the company, the crew, the work … whatever. But nothing could be further from my thoughts. The reason for my not wanting to write this review is because reviews mark the end of something and I find it hard to meet this particular end; the people involved here, the ones leaving because their work is finished, are people I’ve come to so admire and care about.

I’m 63 years old. I’ve hired contractors throughout my life for big jobs, small jobs and all of those in between. Too often I’ve been profoundly amazed at the level of incompetence displayed by self-proclaimed professionals; their work so shoddy that one simply had to accept the entirety of their training must have come from watching YouTube videos or that some had perhaps once made a wooden letter holder for their mother and, having completed that arduous task, then decided they were skilled enough to build houses. After experiencing so many contractor related disappointments through the years, I finally came to often expect the worst as the new normal.

At 62, I bought my retirement home and soon decided it needed some updates that were far beyond my own ability to complete. I began with a clear vision of what I wanted and began seeking out a company, a partner, that could bring my ideas to life. I called or visited companies large and not-so-large and even approached recommended individuals. Most all of these I asked said they couldn’t do what I wanted and those few that said they could really didn’t have the quality materials, proper experience or share vision that I was looking for. In that I would be spending my retirement money on one-time projects, I could no longer afford to have contractors that were only going to provide me with “good-enough” or less. In driving around through southern Illinois and Missouri, I’d seen some beautiful places with completed projects similar to what I wanted but couldn’t bring myself to go up and ask any of the home owners who it was had done the work for them. My bad.

Then I began searching the internet with key terms like outdoor fireplace, stone staircase, outdoor kitchen, etc.; began searching images of such projects that closely matched what I had imagined. Clicking on an image would sometimes provide a link to the company that had built the project. And that’s how it was I came to find an image, clicked on it and discovered a link to Envisioning Green. I thought it an odd name but, hey, the image was all that and so I was willing to reach out this one more time.

Lindsey Bigham answered the phone when I rang Envisioning Green. I was in a mood and immediately launched into a rather loud and semi-accusatory rant the second she finished saying hello...

Continued Here...

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